23 4 / 2014

uzlolzu:

Cleaned up convention sketches.
I Avatarded some characters. That was fun! And Jasper preening… =u=

Alex belongs to Xhakhal

(via much-ado-about-carrots)

23 4 / 2014

rhamphotheca:

This Texas Wasp Moth, Horama panthalon, in Northeastern Mexico, just like cannot fucking… I mean for christ sake WE ARE JUST GOING TO THE GROCERY STORE, not the club… can you like tone it down for one fucking day Liberace?!
photo by Francisco Hernández
(via: Entomology on Facebook)

rhamphotheca:

This Texas Wasp Moth, Horama panthalon, in Northeastern Mexico, just like cannot fucking… I mean for christ sake WE ARE JUST GOING TO THE GROCERY STORE, not the club… can you like tone it down for one fucking day Liberace?!

photo by Francisco Hernández

(via: Entomology on Facebook)

(via i-gotta-go-good-day-pusscake)

23 4 / 2014

In the 19th century, gentlemen used calling cards to formally introduce themselves to new acquaintances and to call upon friends and relatives in a dignified way.

But there was another type of card used when a gentleman wanted to get the ball rolling with a lovely lady in a more casual way: the acquaintance card. According to The Encyclopedia of Ephemera, the acquaintance card was, “A novelty variant of the American calling card of the 1870s and 1880s,” and was

“used by the less formal male in approaches to the less formal female. Given also as an ‘escort card’ or ‘invitation card,’ the device commonly carried a brief message and a simple illustration….Flirtatious and fun, the acquaintance card brought levity to what otherwise might have seemed a more formal proposal. A common means of introduction, it was never taken too seriously.”

The cards were designed as a comical way for a gentleman to break the ice, start a conversation, and flirt with the opposite sex. Sometimes the humor was overt, and sometimes it derived from the way the messages parodied the formal rules of etiquette — it wasn’t actually considered appropriate to ask for your calling card back or volunteer your escorting services so directly, as some of these cards do. Their humor and directness is kind of awesome; as an icebreaker, it seems like they’d be easier for the guy, and more enjoyable for the gal, than a lot of the awkward pick-up tap and dance of the modern day.

(Source: nootelluh, via the-page-mistress)

23 4 / 2014

23 4 / 2014

22 4 / 2014

weandthecolor:

Animup branding by Isabela Rodrigues
Check out more of the Animup identity design by Isabela Rodrigues or discover other graphic design inspiration on WE AND THE COLOR.
Follow WATC on:FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestFlipboardInstagram

weandthecolor:

Animup branding by Isabela Rodrigues

Check out more of the Animup identity design by Isabela Rodrigues or discover other graphic design inspiration on WE AND THE COLOR.

Follow WATC on:
Facebook
Twitter
Google+
Pinterest
Flipboard
Instagram

(via designaemporter)

21 4 / 2014

soupss:

finals are over so I can finally post the rest of my moulin rouge stuff and move on! it was a fun project but my hands are itching to work on something new

(via i-gotta-go-good-day-pusscake)

21 4 / 2014

monocleenterprises:

"And that was how I found out."

(via skyline-sunset-in-my-veins)

21 4 / 2014

strugglingtobeheard:

cynique:

popculturebrain:

Leading Men Age, Leading Women Don’t | Vulture

There are more charts if you click through.

I’m so glad this info graphic is going around, because so many people don’t realize how ageism and misogyny play hand in hand and how the sexualization of young girls play into this.

and how absolutely normalized it is via media such as popular film

(via drhannahlecter)

21 4 / 2014

thedsgnblog:

Brendan Jones   |   http://behance.net/brendanjones

"Academic project for Typography III class. Rebranded logo & design elements around the idea of integration for Google and then implemented them into an annual report for the fiscal year of 2014."

Student in the Bachelor of Fine Arts Visual Communication Design program at Northern Kentucky University.

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(Source: behance.net, via designaemporter)